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The First Burmese Restaurant


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The First Burmese Restaurant


First Burmese Restaurant in San Francisco Open Since 1984

 

Recommended by Michelin Guide, recognized by hundreds of people of Yelp, reviewed by Tasting Table and featured on SF Magazine and SFCheapEats, Mandalay SF has been holding its outstanding reputation and quality service since 1984. 

Burmese food is not yet ubiquitous like the cuisines of its neighbors China, India and Thailand, and this lends it a mystique that most Asian restaurants just can’t maintain in San Francisco. Hip city dwellers want exotic, they want unique, they want special, and Burmese seems like the kind of food that the neighbors might not have discovered yet. But as much as the majority of SF foodies seem to delight in trying something “different” they still tend to popularize the blandest, most americanized establishments like, well...you know. (Read more at Examiner)

Monday - Thursday

11:30 - 2:30pm, 5:00 - 9:30pm 

Friday

11:30 - 2:30pm, 5:00 - 10:00pm

Saturday - Sunday

11:30 - 10:00pm

 

Click here to make reservation or Call  (415) 386-3895 / (415) 386-3896

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Authentic Burmese Food


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Authentic Burmese Food


Authentic Burmese Food

When pressed, Sherry Dung will admit that when her family opened Mandalay in 1984, the tea salad was a bit of a hard sell. “We had to explain to customers that Burmese food was a combination of Indian, Chinese and Thai flavors,” she says, “but with a unique preparation in our own style.”

The city got the memo. While Burmese restaurants are rare elsewhere in the country, here we've embraced tea salad and coconut-curry noodles. Equally remarkable: The 28-year-old Mandalay, now encrusted with knickknacks and Christmas ornaments, has not settled into a customer-pleasing rut. (Read more at Tasting Table)

Familiar fans of authentic Burmese cuisine will find plenty to please their palates here, reveling in these zesty, spicy, and tangy dishes that often include catfish or coconut. For something completely different, discover the Burmese salad–a virtual cacophony of flavor, with pickled mango, cucumber, and toasted garlic in one version; crunchy tea leaves, roasted peanuts, plum tomatoes, jalapeño peppers, and crispy fried lentils in another.